From Zero to Hero: Write Your Short in 30 Days

You'll receive

  • 157 Minutes
    of video

Go from beginner to winner: Here's how to write your award-winning screenplay in 30 days.

Payment 33 Videos

Card

  • Back of card

    123
  • Front of card

    1234 xxxx xxxxxx xxxxx
/
us |

Each additional gift costs $29

Subtotal
0
VAT tax
0
Total
0

You will be charged $29 USD.

2+ hours of video, instant streaming, yours forever! This is a gift purchase for a friend. This is a gift purchase just for . They will receive their copy via email.

2+ hours of video, watch as much as you want for 3 days. This is a gift purchase for a friend. This is a gift purchase just for . They will receive their copy via email.

From Zero to Hero: Write Your Short in 30 Days

Go from beginner to winner: Here's how to write your award-winning screenplay in 30 days.

33 Videos

  • 1. People of letters: Screenwriting scribes through the ages

    2m 47s · Downloadable

  • 2. Lights, camera, action: A brief but badass history of film

    5m 3s · Downloadable

  • 3. Short films: The short cut to a career in film

    6m 27s · Downloadable

  • 4. Late nights, inky fingers, RSI: Why do you want to be a screenwriter, anyway?

    5m 12s · Downloadable

  • 5. Make research your BFF, pt. 1

    4m 47s · Downloadable

  • 6. Phantom Thread: Finding your muse

    5m 22s · Downloadable

  • 7. Avoiding the slush pile: Why your great idea might not actually be filmable

    3m 58s · Downloadable

  • 8. Make research your BFF, pt. 2

    4m 29s · Downloadable

  • 9. WTF is genre, anyway?

    5m 40s · Downloadable

  • 10. Augment your craft with the best tech tools.

    2m 30s · Downloadable

  • 11. What’s a logline got to do with it?

    3m 49s · Downloadable

  • 12. Find your voice – and stick with it.

    4m 42s · Downloadable

  • 13. The hero’s journey in 5 minutes

    5m 22s · Downloadable

  • 14a. Beginning, middle, and end . . . not always in that order.

    7m 6s · Downloadable

  • 14b. Beginning, middle, and end . . . not always in that order.

    7m 12s · Downloadable

  • 15. Plot like Dr. Evil: Get on track & stay on it.

    4m 14s · Downloadable

  • 16. Dialogue that kills

    7m 10s · Downloadable

  • 17. Monologues: To be, or not to be?

    3m 40s · Downloadable

  • 18. “Earl Grey, hot”: Craft characters you can believe in.

    5m 12s · Downloadable

  • 19. Tears for days: How to make the audience care

    3m 1s · Downloadable

  • 20. The bigger the baddie, the bolder the victory

    5m 14s · Downloadable

  • 21. Enter late – get out early.

    3m 41s · Downloadable

  • 22. Bourne again: Infuse your characters with purpose & motivation.

    4m 26s · Downloadable

  • 23a. It Follows: How to write seamless scenes

    4m 5s · Downloadable

  • 23b. It Follows: How to write seamless scenes

    4m 38s · Downloadable

  • 24. Who likes short shorts?

    5m 7s · Downloadable

  • 25. Be a writer – not a director.

    2m 7s · Downloadable

  • 26. Polished perfection: How your script should look

    5m 25s · Downloadable

  • 27. The cutting room: Handling rewrites

    5m 25s · Downloadable

  • 28. Beg, steal, or borrow a proofreader.

    3m 1s · Downloadable

  • 29. Pride comes before a fall: Every writer needs readers.

    6m 21s · Downloadable

  • 30. Make the fat lady sing: Give birth to your script baby.

    4m 30s · Downloadable

  • 31. Manage – don’t micromanage – your creative team.

    5m 57s · Downloadable

  • Thanks!

      $29

    Please check your email for your receipt.

You'll receive the following videos

  1. 1. People of letters: Screenwriting scribes through the ages

    2m 47s · Downloadable

    Ready to bring the ruckus with the hottest movie script the world has ever seen? Just sit down and listen up. If you wanna be the future of screenwriting, you’ll need to study the history of the artform first.

  2. 2. Lights, camera, action: A brief but badass history of film

    5m 3s · Downloadable

    We get it. You’re kind of a big deal just waiting to happen, with a winning screenplay screaming to be unleashed. But now you’ve blown through the history of screenwriting, it’s probably also helpful to brush up on motion picture history too. So throw on something to make you feel intellectual and appreciate the finer details of how film first came to be.

  3. 3. Short films: The short cut to a career in film

    6m 27s · Downloadable

    If you already have a big idea for your screenplay, you could be tempted to explore it as fully as possible with a rambling ninety-page script. No matter how tall your story is though, it could make a superior short film instead.

    Back when film was scaring delicate everymen into thinking a train was about to plow into them, all films were short. Only when feature films became a thing did the term “short” get introduced.

  4. 4. Late nights, inky fingers, RSI: Why do you want to be a screenwriter, anyway?

    5m 12s · Downloadable

    We’ve got a hunch you want to write a screenplay because you’ve been influenced by other outstanding movies. Something about these films struck a chord and made you feel. Maybe they even reflected deep truths about who you are, your values, and your life experiences.

    A great film can plunge a hand deep into your soul and pull out a fistful of emotions, leaving you curled up and weeping on your couch at two in the morning, covered in Dorito dust.

  5. 5. Make research your BFF, pt. 1

    4m 47s · Downloadable

    In order to find out about people, experiences, events, communities, or even hypothetical sci-fi realms, you need to leap out of your comfort zone and step into that world. Use your phone for more than selfies with your cat and start calling significant people.

  6. 6. Phantom Thread: Finding your muse

    5m 22s · Downloadable

    Ever sat in front of a blank screen for a solid hour and not come up with a single bright idea? Sometimes your fountain of inspiration is reduced to a rusty set of pipes coughing up nothing but dust and social media procrastination.

    Here’s the thing about inspiration: it probably won’t come if you’re just sitting there willing it to happen – but it’s essential to discover it.

  7. 7. Avoiding the slush pile: Why your great idea might not actually be filmable

    3m 58s · Downloadable

    The beauty of the short film is its potentially small budget. Opt for impressive stories instead of impressive set pieces and keep the logistics of your narrative down to the bare minimum. Every aspect – from the characters and locations to special effects – must be achievable.

  8. 8. Make research your BFF, pt. 2

    4m 29s · Downloadable

    Some writers have even been along on drug busts with the police, gone into the field with the army, and casually hung out in sex dungeons. These writers produce highly realistic scripts because they spent time in the shoes of their subjects. They’ve soaked up the same atmosphere, experienced the emotions, and witnessed the same notable moments.

    When putting pen to paper, they rarely suffer from writer’s block, because of a springboard of storie...

  9. 9. WTF is genre, anyway?

    5m 40s · Downloadable

    When someone asks you what your film is about, how will you introduce it? Is it a thriller, a comedy, horror, romance, or – lord help us – a bromance?

    Genre is important, and is one of the first things people respond to. You can know whether you want to see a movie within seconds of seeing its promotional poster.

  10. 10. Augment your craft with the best tech tools.

    2m 30s · Downloadable

    You have a bombass story idea. You’ve sweated through all that painstaking research. You’ve stared into space and spun around on your office chair for at least an hour between bursts of productivity. And now you’re ready to start typing up your first draft.

    You open up Microsoft Word and . . . Microsoft Word? Seriously?!

    The painful truth is there is nothing worse than a screenplay in Word. They’re hard to read and more importantly, they lo...

  11. 11. What’s a logline got to do with it?

    3m 49s · Downloadable

    A logline is a marketing tool for agents and producers to get a feel for a piece quickly. A good logline can sell your script to that studio fat cat, while a bad one may be used to light his cigar.

    A logline should be taut and punchy, expressing the essentials of your story.

  12. 12. Find your voice – and stick with it.

    4m 42s · Downloadable

    Like the dulcet voices of the sexiest-ever love songs, the voice of your screenplay sets the tone of your overall joint.

    When it comes to storytelling, tone is the incredibly important core emotion you want the audience to feel. Don’t dilly-dally; jump on that pony and establish your tone right away. The audience needs to know what emotions they’re in for.

  13. 13. The hero’s journey in 5 minutes

    5m 22s · Downloadable

    When crafting your story, ask yourself, “What will my character learn through this journey of change? Before you write anything – even a title – know the answer to that question.

  14. 14a. Beginning, middle, and end . . . not always in that order.

    7m 6s · Downloadable

    You’d be surprised how many scripts fail because they don’t have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Think of it as the simple everyday recipe by which you’ll learn how to cook up a great script. So let’s break down all the essentials of this dish.

  15. 14b. Beginning, middle, and end . . . not always in that order.

    7m 12s · Downloadable

    You’d be surprised how many scripts fail because they don’t have a clear beginning, middle, and end. Think of it as the simple everyday recipe by which you’ll learn how to cook up a great script. So let’s break down all the essentials of this dish.

  16. 15. Plot like Dr. Evil: Get on track & stay on it.

    4m 14s · Downloadable

    Pick up a boatload of index cards, as you’re going to be turning the wall of your workstation into your movie. Blake Snyder, the dude who wrote Save the Cat, calls this a “beat sheet”.

    There are actually several types of beats, but for this lesson we’ll explore plot beats. Plot beats are units of action that make up your story.

  17. 16. Dialogue that kills

    7m 10s · Downloadable

    Think of dialogue as the hot sauce of your script. In fact, think of it as the hottest sauce imaginable – pure fire that could kill a man if handled improperly. Use it only when absolutely necessary.

  18. 17. Monologues: To be, or not to be?

    3m 40s · Downloadable

    Don’t have something purposeful or actionable to add to your script? Then don’t use a monologue. But if your words are vital and rousing on every level, congratulations! You may just have a monologue that earns its place on the page.

  19. 18. “Earl Grey, hot”: Craft characters you can believe in.

    5m 12s · Downloadable

    “Characters are a metaphor for human nature.”

    That’s a quote from screenwriting expert Robert McKee – and it’s true. This is why it’s so important you take the time to develop characters with real depth.

  20. 19. Tears for days: How to make the audience care

    3m 1s · Downloadable

    Just because you’ve thought of an interesting main character doesn’t mean audiences will give a damn if they live or die. You might think adorning your character with interesting traits and making them seem as real as possible would be enough to make an audience care, but that just isn’t always so.

  21. 20. The bigger the baddie, the bolder the victory

    5m 14s · Downloadable

    Your villain is what makes your hero stand out and dazzle. Whatever shape your antagonist takes, you want it to be crafted just as well as the protagonist is.

  22. 21. Enter late – get out early.

    3m 41s · Downloadable

    It’s the golden rule that’ll keep your screenplay tighter than Terry Cruz’s abs: Get in late and leave early.

    Cut as much as you can out of the beginning and end of each scene and see if it still works. As soon as the goal of each scene is achieved, get out of there!

  23. 22. Bourne again: Infuse your characters with purpose & motivation.

    4m 26s · Downloadable

    You’ve crafted multidimensional characters who feel real & relatable, and you’ve given them a journey worth caring about. What’s next?

    You want to infuse those suckers with some serious motivation!

    A character’s motivation is something to which viewers try to relate. They want to understand fully why characters do what they do.

  24. 23a. It Follows: How to write seamless scenes

    4m 5s · Downloadable

    Ever wondered if there’s more to the magic of storytelling?

    You know there’s something enchanting about the way a particular movie or TV show moves forward, but you’re not exactly sure why. What is it that makes it flow so well?

    We’ve already touched on that in “Enter late, leave early”, which is how we know you’re ready for the next step: crafting beautifully flowing scenes.

  25. 23b. It Follows: How to write seamless scenes

    4m 38s · Downloadable

    Ever wondered if there’s more to the magic of storytelling?

    You know there’s something enchanting about the way a particular movie or TV show moves forward, but you’re not exactly sure why. What is it that makes it flow so well?

    We’ve already touched on that in “Enter late, leave early”, which is how we know you’re ready for the next step: crafting beautifully flowing scenes.

  26. 24. Who likes short shorts?

    5m 7s · Downloadable

    We know the prospect of writing a short film only two minutes long may not be hugely exciting – but we do urge you to consider it. A 90-second movie can help draw attention to your talents. If a film can prompt big emotions, unique thoughts, or bust a gut with laughter in such a short duration, it will definitely be more memorable.

  27. 25. Be a writer – not a director.

    2m 7s · Downloadable

    Instead of making yourself look amateurish by inserting camera angles or shot suggestions on every page, trust the director to know exactly where to put the camera. As a screenwriter, your opinions on direction will likely hold little influence to the final cut anyways. Keep those ideas off the page and just concentrate on being a dynamite wordsmith.

  28. 26. Polished perfection: How your script should look

    5m 25s · Downloadable

    Avoid being discarded immediately by decision makers reading your script by following these rules to a tee. Think of your script as the ultimate sales pitch for your talent. So present it as perfectly as possible to ensure that someone, somewhere will be desperate to snap it up.

  29. 27. The cutting room: Handling rewrites

    5m 25s · Downloadable

    You’ve poured your blood, sweat, and tears into this little beauty. You want to ensure the end result is just as masterful as you envisioned when the idea occurred to you.

    Be vicious, be merciless, and be smart with that screenwriting scalpel. Making those essential cuts can make for a killer script – one you’ll be excited and proud to share with the world.

  30. 28. Beg, steal, or borrow a proofreader.

    3m 1s · Downloadable

    Proofreading is key, as obvious errors in your script could prevent a reader from wanting to engage any further with it. It’s apparent if your screenplay hasn’t been proofread, and that comes across as lazy.

    Take the time and effort to proofread. Your script deserves to be perfect, and the people reading it deserve to enjoy the genius of your story without a single typo to distract them.

  31. 29. Pride comes before a fall: Every writer needs readers.

    6m 21s · Downloadable

    Be careful to choose the correct people to entrust this fragile bambino of a script to. It might be easier on your ego to give it to folk who will heap nothing but unconstructive praise upon it, but that won’t allow this baby to grow.

    You want readers who’ll let you know if a line is a little clichéd, tell you if that bawdy dialogue sounded right coming from a nun, and point out plot holes.

  32. 30. Make the fat lady sing: Give birth to your script baby.

    4m 30s · Downloadable

    Learn from missteps and continue to practice screenwriting. As long as you go about getting your talent noticed in the appropriate manner, you’ll eventually succeed in your dream. The cream always rises to the top.

  33. 31. Manage – don’t micromanage – your creative team.

    5m 57s · Downloadable

    If you want your script baby to grow, you have to let it go. Trust that your creative team is just as invested in making the best movie possible as you were when writing it. The story doesn’t belong solely to you anymore, but to the whole team.